BIBLE TRIVIA

 

Moses' father-in-law shares his first name with a classic TV sitcom character.

A. Amos (McCoy)

B. Jed (Clampett)

C. Jethro (Bodine)

D. Tobias (Funke)

 

Last weeks answer:  the Book of Psalms has 150 psalms

 

 

CATHOLIC TRIVIA!

 

The first Catholic Diocese in the US:

A. Baltimore

B. Boston

C. New York

D. Philadelphia

Last weeks answer: 

Pope Francis hails from Argentina

 

++++++++++++++++

 

 

Grumbling

or

Grateful  

                    " Is it not lawful for me to do what I will with mine own? or is thine eye evil, because I am good? 16 So the last shall be first, and the first last."

Matthew  20:15

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  All Saints' Day is a solemn holy day of the Catholic Church celebrated annually on November 1. The day is dedicated to the saints of the Church, that is, all those who have attained heaven. It should not be confused with All Souls' Day, which is observed on November 2, and is dedicated to those who have died and not yet reached heaven.

   Although millions, or even billions of people may already be saints, All Saints' Day observances tend to focus on known saints -- that is those recognized in the canon of the saints by the Catholic Church.

     

   All Saints' Day was formally started by Pope Boniface IV, who consecrated the Pantheon at Rome to the Virgin Mary and all the Martyrs on May 13 in 609 AD. Boniface IV also established All Souls' Day, which follows All Saints. 

The holy day was eventually established on November 1 by Pope Gregory III in the mid-eighth century as a day dedicated to the saints and their relics. The May 13 celebration was subsequently abandoned.

The Catholic practice celebrates all those who have entered heaven, including saints who are recognized by the Church and those who are not.

Holy day customs vary around the world. In the United States, the day before is Halloween and is usually celebrated by dressing in costumes with themes of death commonly associated. Children go door-to-door in costume, trick-or-treating, that is soliciting candy from their neighbors. The holiday has lost much of its connection to its religious origins. Celebrations often blur the distinction between All Saints' Day, which is properly dedicated to those who are in heaven, and All Souls' Day, on which prayers are offered for all those who have died, but have not yet reached heaven.

 

   All Souls Day is a holy day set aside for honoring the dead. The day is primarily celebrated in the Catholic Church, but it is also celebrated in the Eastern Orthodox Church and a few other denominations of Christianity.

According to Catholic belief, the soul of a person who dies can go to one of three places. The first is heaven, where a person who dies in a state of perfect grace and communion with God goes. The second is hell, where those who die in a state of mortal sin are naturally condemned by their choice. The intermediate option is purgatory, which is thought to be where most people, free of mortal sin, but still in a state of lesser (venial) sin, must go.

   Purgatory is necessary so that souls can be cleansed and perfected before they enter into heaven. There is scriptural basis for this belief. The primary Bible reference is in 2 Maccabees, 12:26 and 12:32. "Turning to supplication, they prayed that the sinful deed might be fully blotted out... thus made atonement for the dead that they might be free from sin."  Consistent with these teachings and traditions, Catholics believe that partially through the prayers of the faithful on Earth, the dead are cleansed of their sins so they may enter into heaven.